SCOTT STAPP: 'It's More Important Than Ever To Use Your Voice Constructively'

SCOTT STAPP: 'It's More Important Than Ever To Use Your Voice Constructively'

Grammy-winning songwriter, solo artist, and voice of CREED, Scott Stapp has released a highly charged lyric video for "World I Used To Know". A fan favorite from Stapp's comeback album, its personal lyrics and angst-ridden riffs cut deep, as arguments and unrest populate headlines and divide households.

The empowering, propulsive track is an observational critique that intentionally raises important questions as it seeks to be saved from "tomorrow's sins."

Stapp elaborates: "We're all wondering what's next and hoping we can quickly get back to the world we knew just seven months ago. As we mask up and maintain distance, it's more important than ever to use your voice constructively. Your vote is your voice."

Originally written in 2018 by Stapp, "World I Used To Know" is the opening track on "The Space Between The Shadows", which debuted atop rock and album charts in the U.S. and U.K. in July 2019. Stapp's first solo album in six years explores themes of rising above internal and external struggles.

Stapp is known as frontman for CREED (over 50 million albums sold worldwide), and for his work as a solo artist who released the platinum-certified "The Great Divide" (2005) and "Proof Of Life" (2013), which featured his first solo Billboard No. 1, "Slow Suicide".

Stapp went through a highly publicized, drug-inflamed meltdown in 2014, after which he entered into an intensive rehab program. Stapp also lost custody of his three children during this period, while also missing a court hearing and allegedly threatening to kill President Obama.

After completing rehab, Scott spent the following year in intensive therapy. Although he was initially diagnosed with bipolar disorder, it was later determined that it was severe depression that led to addiction. Now nearing six years of sobriety, Stapp spoke to Men's Health about health and fitness in 2019 when his comeback album was released, saying, "I hate to use the word, but I guess it has become my new addiction."

COMMENTS

To comment on a BLABBERMOUTH.NET story or review, you must be logged in to an active personal account on Facebook. Once you're logged in, you will be able to comment. User comments or postings do not reflect the viewpoint of BLABBERMOUTH.NET and BLABBERMOUTH.NET does not endorse, or guarantee the accuracy of, any user comment. To report spam or any abusive, obscene, defamatory, racist, homophobic or threatening comments, or anything that may violate any applicable laws, use the "Report to Facebook" and "Mark as spam" links that appear next to the comments themselves. To do so, click the downward arrow on the top-right corner of the Facebook comment (the arrow is invisible until you roll over it) and select the appropriate action. You can also send an e-mail to blabbermouthinbox(@)gmail.com with pertinent details. BLABBERMOUTH.NET reserves the right to "hide" comments that may be considered offensive, illegal or inappropriate and to "ban" users that violate the site's Terms Of Service. Hidden comments will still appear to the user and to the user's Facebook friends. If a new comment is published from a "banned" user or contains a blacklisted word, this comment will automatically have limited visibility (the "banned" user's comments will only be visible to the user and the user's Facebook friends).