HALESTORM's LZZY HALE Praises Teenage Climate Activist GRETA THUNBERG: You Are 'Our Modern-Day JOAN OF ARC'

HALESTORM's LZZY HALE Praises Teenage Climate Activist GRETA THUNBERG: You Are 'Our Modern-Day JOAN OF ARC'

HALESTORM's Lzzy Hale has praised Greta Thunberg as "our modern-day Joan of Arc," saying that the teenage climate activist is "sitting at a round table of young women who have inspired and shaped humanity."

The Swedish teenager has gained international media attention in recent months for her outspoken activism on climate change, including delivering an impassioned speech to the United Nations Climate Action Summit calling out world leaders for not responding to the climate crisis with more urgency.

President Donald Trump, who has repeatedly voiced skepticism about climate changere, shared video of Thunberg's speech on Twitter, and above it wrote, sarcastically, that "she seems like a very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future. So nice to see!"

Earlier today, Lzzy took to social media to share a photo of Thunberg at the U.N. podium and included the following message: "Our modern day Joan of Arc. @gretathunberg Thank you for your candor, grace,logic and beautiful anger. Wield your sword. You are sitting at a round table of young women who have inspired and shaped humanity."

Hale went on to name a few other children who made a positive difference in the world through words and actions, including Ruby Bridges, Anne Frank, Malala Yousafzai, Claudette Colvin, Audrey Faye Hendricks and Mary Shelley.

Thunberg seemingly took Trump's slight in stride. Earlier today, she updated her Twitter bio to read: "A very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future."

In her speech to the U.N., Thunberg said: "This is all wrong. I shouldn't be up here. I should be back in school on the other side of the ocean.

"Yet you all come to us young people for hope. How dare you? You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words. And yet, I'm one of the lucky ones.

"People are suffering. People are dying and dying ecosystems are collapsing.

"We are in the beginning of a mass extinction and all you can talk about is money and fairytales of eternal economic growth.

"How dare you continue to look away and come here saying that you're doing enough when the politics and solutions needed are still nowhere in sight," she said. "You say you hear us and that you understand the urgency, but no matter how sad and angry I am, I do not want to believe that. Because if you really understood the situation and still kept on failing to act then you would be evil, and that I refuse to believe."











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Our modern day Joan of Arc. @gretathunberg Thank you for your candor, grace,logic and beautiful anger. Wield your sword. You are sitting at a round table of young women who have inspired and shaped humanity. Here’s a few! In 1960 at the age of 6, Ruby Bridges became the first black student to attend William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans. The first-grader faced protests and riots/had to walk to school accompanied by federal marshals. She became an icon in the Civil Rights Movement. A German-born Jewish girl, Anne Frank rose to fame following the publication of the diary she kept while hiding from the Gestapo. After her family was discovered and arrested, Frank died at Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in 1945 at the age of 15. Her father Otto the only surviving family member was moved reading her diary after the war and published it.It has been translated into more than 60 languages. Malala Yousafzai is a Pakistani human rights advocate known for her activism in promoting education for girls. In 2012, when she was just 15 years old, a Taliban gunman shot her in an assassination attempt in retaliation for her work. At the age of 17, she received the Nobel Peace Prize, becoming the youngest Nobel laureate. Nine months before Rosa Parks' famous arrest, 15-year-old Claudette Colvin stood up against segregation in Alabama by refusing to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery. She was arrested, and a year later was one of the original plaintiffs in Browder v. Gayle, a case that led the U.S. Supreme Court to declare bus segregation laws in Alabama and Montgomery unconstitutional. In 1963, 9-year-old Audrey Faye Hendricks joined thousands of fellow kids and teens in the Children's Crusade, a nonviolent demonstration in Birmingham to stand against segregation. Hendricks spent a week in jail for her activism. Images from the Children's Crusade highlighted the violent response from local authorities &caused outrage around the world. And English author Mary Shelley was just 18 years old when she wrote Frankenstein, which many credit as the origin of science fiction! Who run this mother?


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